Alcohol and You

  1. Hangovers
    1. 25-30% of drinkers are naturally resistant to experiencing hangovers
    2. Common symptoms: dehydration, nausea, headache, fatigue, fever, vomiting, diarrhea, flatulence, sensitivity to light and sound, trouble sleeping, difficulty concentrating, and poor depth perception
    3. Causes
      1. Vasopressin Inhibition
        1. Kidneys send water directly to the bladder instead of reabsorbing it into the body
        2. Four times as much liquid lost as gained
        3. Body's organs try to make up for their own water loss by stealing water from the brain
        4. Sodium, potassium, glycogen loss
      2. Congeners
        1. Greatest amounts of these toxins are found in red wine and dark liquors
        2. Carbonation in beer actually speeds up the absorption of alcohol
      3. Acetaldehyde
        1. Created when the alcohol in the liver is broken down by an enzyme called alcohol dehydrogenase then attacked by acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and glutathione
        2. Liver's stores of glutathione quickly run out, acetaldehyde build up
        3. Body weight a factor
      4. Glutamine Rebound
        1. Alcohol inhibits glutamine, body overcompensates production
        2. Stimulates the brain while trying to sleep
        3. Promotes secretion of hydrochloric acid in the stomach, vomiting
  2. Prevention and Cures
    1. Caffeine - reduces the size of blood vessels but also diuretic
    2. Fried or Fatty Foods - Good before drinking, coat stomach lining
    3. Eggs - cysteine breaks down acetaldehyde
    4. Bananas - electrolytes and potassium
    5. Water - before and after
    6. Fruit juice and vitamins supplements - C and B vitamins
    7. Pain relievers - aspirin fine before and after but never use acetaminophen (Tylenol)
  3. Calories and “Beer Gut”
    1. Process
      1. A small portion of the alcohol is converted into fat.
      2. Your liver then converts most of the alcohol into acetate.
      3. The acetate is then released into your bloodstream, and replaces fat as a source of fuel.
    2. Increases appetite
    3. See appendix for “Calories by Beverage”
  4. Intoxication
    1. Common measurements
      1. 12 oz. 5% ABV beer
      2. 5 oz. 12% ABV wine
      3. 1.5 oz. 40% ABV liquor
    2. Human body can process 0.5 oz. (15 ml) alcohol per hour
    3. BAC increases when the body absorbs alcohol faster than it can eliminate it
    4. 20 oz. Two-Hearted (7% ABV) = 2.3 drinks

Resources

Appendix

Calories by Beverage

  ABV Calories Carbs Carb Calories Remainder Est. Alcohol Cal Rate
Big Foot 9.2 330 32.1 128.4 201.6 21.91
Leinenkugel’s Fireside 4.9 155 13.4 53.6 101.4 20.69
Budweiser 5 143 10.6 42.4 100.6 20.12
Bud Light 4.2 95 6.6 26.4 68.6 16.33
MGD 64 2.8 64 2.4 9.6 54.4 19.43
Flying Dog IPA 7.1 188 10 40 148 20.85
Guinness 4 125 10 40 85 21.25
Rum 40 780 0 0 780 19.50
Homebrew A (SG 1.050, FG 1.012) 5.1 165 16.7 66.8 98.2 19.25
Homebrew B (SG 1.080, FG 1.020) 8 264 27.4 109.6 154.4 19.30

* Assumes 12 oz. samples

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